Featuring Magne Mogstad

We are postponing the event until a future date, to be announced; we are sorry for the inconvenience.

Public debate is increasingly focused on a subject that economists have been analyzing for several decades: the causes and consequences of labor market inequality. Most popular discussion concerns the income or wealth shares of the very rich, often the top 1 percent. While relevant, the top 1 percent is only one percent of the population. In this talk, Magne Mogstad will focus on the other 99 percent, answering two important questions: First, what are the key drivers of labor market inequality? Second, how is labor market inequality affected by public policy?

The event will begin with a 60-minute Leaders in Philanthropy welcome reception, open to all registrants, in celebration of the transformative power of philanthropy at the University of Chicago. The lecture presentation and a postreception will immediately follow.

Questions?
Contact alumni@uchicago.edu or 773.702.2150.

Event Details

6:00 p.m. Registration and networking
7:00 p.m. Presentation and discussion
8:15 p.m. Reception

$20/person
$10/Maroon Loyalty Society member or recent graduate (College alumni of the past 10 years and graduate alumni of the past five years)
Free for current academic year graduates and current students
Two complimentary registrations for members of the Chicago, Harper, Odyssey, and Phoenix philanthropic societies

Learn more about UChicago giving societies.

Featured Faculty

 

Magne Mogstad is the Gary S. Becker Professor in Economics at the University of Chicago and the director of the Ronzetti Initiative for the Study of Labor Markets at the Becker Friedman Institute. His primary research fields are labor economics, public economics, and economic inequality, and his research focuses on how to address market failures and equalize opportunities. Mogstad has published extensively in leading scholarly journals, and he is currently an editor of the Journal of Political Economy. He earned his PhD in economics from the University of Oslo.